TELEVISION

PUGET SOUND TELEVISION

Here is the current list of Puget Sound DTV “Virtual” and Over-The-Air Digital Channels.
Digital television (DTV) channels may operate on different physical channels from the displayed channels. A station branded as Channel 7, for example, might actually use channel 39 for its transmission, but a “virtual channel map” or virtual channel table (VCT) allows viewers to tune in the station on channel 7, displayed as 7.1 on a digital set.

4.1 KOMO ABC

[Digital 38] (Sinclair Broadcast Group) local news and network shows. KOMO Channel 4 Seattle, founded by Fisher’s Blend company, a family that pioneered radio in Seattle and owned KOMO Radio – went on the air on December 10, 1953. KOMO 4 took the NBC programming away from KMO TV 13. Harriet Bullitt lobbied NBC for affiliation and in 1959 NBC pulled its affiliation from KING’s cross-town rival, KOMO 4, and granted it to KING. KOMO became the ABC affiliate. Fisher sells KOMO TV & radio to Sinclair Broadcast Group – announced April 2013. -Seattle-

4.2 KOMO DT2 COMET tv

Science fiction shows and movies

4.3 KOMO DT3 GRIT

primarily focuses on feature films, and is targeted at men between the ages of 25 and 54 years old. [added December 2014]

5.1 KING NBC

[Digital 48] (TEGNA — Gannett Corporation) local news and network shows. KRSC Channel 5 went on the air on Thanksgiving Day, 1948. Owned by P.K. Lieberman’s Radio Sales Corporation, the company that also owned 1150 KRSC Radio.
Channel 5 was purchased by Dorothy Bullitt’s King Broadcasting Company, owners of KING 1090 Radio, becoming KING TV in 1949. KING 5 held all the network programming DUMONT, CBS, NBC and ABC. On August 2, 1953, KMO TV 13 Tacoma, owned by Carl E. Haymond, who also owned KMO Radio, went on the air, taking the NBC affiliation, leaving Channel 5 with ABC and some Dumont programming. Harriet Bullitt lobbied NBC for affiliation and in 1959 NBC pulled its affiliation from KING’s cross-town rival, KOMO 4, which had acquired it from KMO 13 when KOMO went on air in 1953. NBC affiliation was now granted to KING. KING 5 station-owner Dorothy Bullitt died in June 1989. Dorothy Bullitt’s daughters Harriet Bullitt and Priscilla “Patsy” Bullitt Collins decided to sell the King assets in 1992 to the Providence Journal (ProJo) Company. KING-TV and other King Broadcasting stations later became Belo properties as a result of a merger with ProJo in 1997. BELO is acquired by Gannett in 2013. -Seattle

5.2 KING DT2 Justice Network

crime & cop shows

7.1 KIRO CBS

[Digital 39] (Cox Communications) local news and network shows. On February 8, 1958, KIRO 7 Seattle [owned by Saul Haas, who owned KIRO Radio] went on the air and became the CBS affiliate. KTNT 11 became Tacoma’s second Independent TV station. 1964- Bonneville International Corporation, part of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, took ownership of KIRO-AM-FM-TV. KIRO was sold by Bonneville to Belo Corporation in 1995. The station affiliated with UPN on March 13, 1995, after CBS moved the network affiliation to KSTW 11, in a deal with Gaylord Television which included the Gaylord Dallas station as a new CBS affiliate. 1996- Gaylord announced the sale of KSTW to Cox Enterprises. KSTW’s sale was finalized on May 30, 1997.
When the Providence Journal/Belo Corp. merger happened in 1997, KSTW was sold to Viacom, KIRO to Cox, and former CBS O&O KMOV in St. Louis going from Viacom (who was selling off all non-UPN stations) to Belo. The two Seattle stations retained their respective syndicated programming, but swapped network affiliations once again, with KSTW becoming a UPN O&O, and KIRO regaining its CBS affiliation. -Seattle-

7.2 KIRO DT2 GET TV Television Network

Old movies

7.3 KIRO DT3 LAFF

comedy and archived sitcoms

9.1 KCTS PBS

[Digital 9] (KCTS Television) local news and network shows. KCTS 9 went on the air on December 7, 1954, broadcasting from the campus of the University of Washington with equipment donated by KING-TV owner Dorothy Bullitt. The station was operated by students of the Edison Technical School in Seattle, now known as Seattle Community College. The instructor was Nick Foster, formerly the operator of KFQX, bootlegger Roy Olmstead’s radio station. Network affiliation was with National Educational Television. -Seattle-

9.2 KCTS DT2 V-me

Public Television in Spanish

9.3 KCTS DT3 Create

how-to, cooking and DIY programs

11.1 KSTW CW Network

[Digital 11] (CBS Corporation) network shows. KTNT Channel 11, Tacoma, owned by the Baker family, publishers of the Tacoma News Tribune and owners of KTNT Radio, went on the air March 1, 1953. KTNT 11 became the CBS TV affiliate. On February 8, 1958, KIRO 7 Seattle [owned by Saul Haas, who owned KIRO Radio] went on the air and became the CBS affiliate. KTNT 11 became Tacoma’s second Independent TV station. Also in 1974 — KTNT was sold to Gaylord Entertainment Company. Gaylord changed its call letters to KSTW, for Seattle-Tacoma, Washington. 1993- KSTW agreed to become the WB affiliate for Seattle beginning in 1995, when the network was to begin operation. The affiliation actually went to KTZZ Channel 22.
In 1995, CBS approached Gaylord for an affiliation with its Dallas station, KTVT. KSTW was included as part of the agreement, and as a result, CBS returned to KSTW on March 13, 1995, in a ten-year affiliation agreement. 1996- Gaylord announced the sale of KSTW to Cox Enterprises. KSTW’s sale was finalized on May 30, 1997.
When the Providence Journal/Belo Corp. merger happened in 1997, KSTW was sold to Viacom, KIRO to Cox, and former CBS O&O KMOV in St. Louis going from Viacom (who was selling off all non-UPN stations) to Belo. The two Seattle stations retained their respective syndicated programming, but swapped network affiliations once again, with KSTW becoming a UPN O&O, and KIRO regaining its CBS affiliation.
Cox held KSTW for just three days prior to the trade. KSTW began to air UPN programming on June 30, 1997 along with sitcoms, movies, cartoons and a few first-run syndicated shows. The station brought back its 10pm newscast and dropped its news production at all other time slots. The station canceled the 10pm newscast in December 1998. On January 24, 2006, the WB and UPN networks announced they would merge into a new network called The CW. CBS-owned KSTW, the then-current UPN station, was chosen as The CW’s Seattle-Tacoma affiliate. -Tacoma-

11.2 DECADES CBS classic TV & News

12.1 KVOS MeTV

[Digital 35] (OTA Broadcasting, LLC) classic television, [Started as a Seattle radio station, KVOS] – Kessler’s Voice of Seattle. Moved to Bellingham and picked up TV license. Once a CBS affiliate, KVOS struggled as an Independent and after purchase by Michael Dell’s OTA Broadcasting, moved studio facilities to Seattle. On March 12, 2015, the main feed of KVOS had adopted to KFFV’s 44.6 feed, the branding itself had been switched from MeTV KVOS to MeTV Seattle while the ident shows MeTV KVOS-KFFV. City of license is Bellingham-

12.2 KVOS MOVIES!

– old movies

12.3 KVOS HEROES & ICONS

(SSTV) – Action-Adventure TV re-run programming from the 50s-70s [Weigel Broadcasting]

13.1 KCPQ FOX

[Digital 13] (Tribune Company) local news and network shows. Began as KMO 13 August 1953, owned by Carl Haymond, successful radio station owner. The TV franchise suffered financial losses, after losing NBC affiliation to KOMO in 1953. Sold to J. Elroy McCaw in 1954, the station struggled through the 1960s and early 1970s, in black and white 2ith low budget productions, a small library of 1940s films and 1950s TV reruns. J. Elroy’s son, Craig McCaw was founder, in 1987, of McCaw Cellular Communications, Inc., a cellular telephone pioneer in the United States. The company purchased MCI Communications’s mobile businesses in 1986, followed by LIN Broadcasting in 1989, giving them widespread access in all of the major US markets. Partnering with AT&T as a technology provider, McCaw introduced their “Cellular One” service in 1990, the first truly national cellular system. AT&T purchased 33% of the company in 1992, and arranged a merger in 1994 that made Craig McCaw one of AT&T’s largest shareholders. In 2002, the company was spun off from AT&T to become AT&T Wireless Services. With the sale of Channel 13 to McCaw, KMO then became KTVW 13. Having been an NBC affiliate for just a little over 4 months, Channel 13 studios, originally located at the Roxy Theater in Tacoma, relocated to the transmitter site. J. Elroy McCaw died in 1969 and KTVW 13 was purchased by Blaidon Mutual Investors Corporation in 1971 for $1.1 million. Color-capable cameras were purchased, more local programming, including an afternoon Merv Griffin-style variety show [The Tony Visco Show] and a kiddie-cartoon show with a super-hero host, Flash Blaidon were introduced.
Blaidon Mutual Investors Corporation filed bankruptcy in 1974, and KTVW 13 went dark. 1975- Channel 13′s assets were bought in bankruptcy court bidding by the Clover Park School District in Lakewood, for $378,000. The call letters were changed to KCPQ, replacing Clover Park’s UHF channel 56 transmitter which had operated under the name KPEC-TV. Channel 13 returned to the air as an educational station, an affiliate of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which had previously been National Educational Television [merged 1970] 1980- Sacramento, California-based Kelly Broadcasting, owners of KCRA-TV in its home city, purchased KCPQ 13 from the Clover Park School District for $6.25 million. Q13, was “The Northwest’s Movie Channel”. Channel 13 ran movies during middays, late nights and weekends, and uncut versions of films in primetime. The station also ran CBS and NBC shows that KIRO-TV and KING-TV respectively pre-empted, including CBS Late Night and NBC’s Saturday morning cartoons. For a short time after the relaunch, the station had an afternoon children’s program, “Captain Sea-Tac”, featuring a friendly boat captain who appeared to be in his 30s or so. 1986- KCPQ became one of the first affiliates of the FOX Broadcasting Company. The Tribune Company acquired KCPQ in August 1998, as part of Kelly Broadcasting’s exit from the television business. Following the purchase of Channel 13, Tribune merged KCPQ’s operations with those of KTWB 22, which Tribune had operated under a local marketing agreement with Emmis Communications. The two stations became co-owned in 1999, after the FCC approved same-market duopolies. -Tacoma-

13.2 THIS Network

Movies – network is a subsidiary of Tribune Co. – Tacoma

13.3 ESCAPE TV

Movies and TV shows that are sexy, daring and based on true crime stories. ESCAPE is a subsidiary of Katz Broadcasting, LLC, – Tacoma

16.1 KONG DT Independent

[Digital 31] (Gannett) syndicated reruns and rebroadcasts of KING News, local sports and some NBC programming such as “Meet The Press.” KONG 16 signed on the air July 8, 1997.
It was locally owned, but managed by KING-TV (which Belo had just acquired) through a local marketing agreement. Belo bought Channel 16 outright in 2000, when the Federal Communications Commission began to permit duopolies. BELO is acquired by Gannett in 2013. -Everett-

16.2 KONG DT2

simulcasts KONG 16.1

20.1 KTBW TBN Network

[Digital 14] (Trinity Broadcasting Network) religion. Signed on as KQFB on March 30, 1984. As KQFB, the station was originally locally owned by Family Broadcasting based in University Place, WA. Family Broadcasting originally was going to broadcast Christian programming from several sources. Before the station went on the air, a minority interest in KQFB was acquired by the Trinity Broadcasting Network. When TBN acquired all the interest in Family Broadcasting, the call letters changed from KQFB to KTBW -Tacoma-

20.2 KTBW DT2 TCC

The Church Channel – religion

20.3 KTBW DT3 JCTV

JUCE music videos – religion

20.4 KTBW DT4 Enlace

en Espanol

20.5 KTBW DT5 SOAC

Smile of a Child family programming

22.1 KZJO MyTV Network

[Digital 25] (Tribune Company) off-network reruns and movies; rebroadcasts Q13 News. On June 22, 1985, KTZZ Channel 22 went on the air in Seattle, owned by Alden Television, Inc., Los Angeles, CA. 1989- KTZZ Channel 22 was sold to Dudley Broadcasting. In 1993, KTZZ became an affiliate of the WB Network. Following the purchase of Channel 13, Tribune merged KCPQ’s operations with those of KTWB 22, which Tribune had operated under a local marketing agreement with Emmis Communications. The two stations became co-owned in 1999, after the FCC approved same-market duopolies.
After Tribune acquired KTZZ, Channel 22 changed its call letters to KTWB-TV (The Warner Brothers Network). In 2004, KTWB revised its on-air brand from WB 22 to Seattle’s WB as part of a groupwide branding effort. On May 15, 2006, Tribune announced that it would affiliate channel 22 with MyNetworkTV.
On July 14, 2006, channel 22′s call letters were officially changed to KMYQ to reflect its new affiliation, and the station’s brand name was changed to myQ on August 7, 2006. On September 13, 2010, the station moved its MyNetworkTV programming to 11:00 p.m. KMYQ changed its call letters to KZJO and rebranded as JOEtv. The station airs mostly syndicated programming such as The Simpsons, My Name is Earl and King of the Hill in addition to the MyNetworkTV programming. -Seattle-

22.2 KZJO DT2 FOX

Network rebroadcasts and off-network reruns;

22.3 KZJO DT3 Antenna TV

off-network reruns and classic television

24.1 KBCB Shopping

Venture Technologies Group [Bellingham], originally on-air as KEGA February 1989. 21st Century FOX announced purchase for $10 million October 2014. The sale was not completed. This was a negotiating tactic with KCPQ 13 for more $$.

28.1 KBTC PBS

[Digital 27] (Bates Technical College) -Tacoma-

28.2 KBTC DT2 NHK World

English language public media television channel filled with international news, business, technology, and science information and life styles, culture, and travel programs produced and present- ed from Japanese and Asian perspectives.

28.3 KBTC DT3 MHz Worldview

International, News

28.3 KBTC DT4 TVW

Political, News and gavel to gavel action of the Washington State Legislature

33.1 KWPX DT ION Network

[Digital 33] (ION Media Network) Entertainment and children’s programming. Former call sign: KBGE -Bellevue-

33.2 KWPX DT2 qubo

Children’s programming

33.3 KWPX DT3 ION

Off-network reruns, Life-Health & DIY

33.4 KWPX SD ShopTV

33.5 KWPX SD QVC

33.6 KWPX SD Telemundo

42.1 KWDK DT Daystar

[Digital 42 – OTA 56.1] (Community Television Educators, Inc. a subsidiary of Word of God Fellowship, Inc.) religion -Tacoma-

44.1 KFFV EVINE Live/OnTV4Us

(OTA Broadcasting, LLC.) -Seattle-

44.2 KFFV DT2 Azteca Network

Spanish language programming

44.3 KFFV DT3 AAT

Television International programming

44.4 KFFV DT4 KBS World

44.5 KFFV DT5 COZI TV

– Classic TV

44.6 KFFV DT6 ME TV

– Classic TV

46.1 KUSE LD

[Digital 46] RETRO TV – 50s-80sTV reruns LUKEN Communications diginet -Seattle –

46.6 KUSE LD-6

REV’N -Everything What Moves You * geared to racing fans and car buffs- LUKEN Communications diginet

51.1 KUNS DT Univision

[Digital 51] (Sinclair Broadcasting) Spanish-language news, serials, movies and sports. Call signs previously: KBEH (1999–2000)
KWOG (2000–2006) -Bellevue-

51.2 KUNS DT2 MundoFOX

Spanish language drama and comedy programs