The video-disc revolution

stredicke-headerVICTOR STREDICKE/ May 18, 1979 — A videodisc looks like a 12-inch phonograph record. But it’s silvery surface reflects like a rainbow. And when it is placed on a videodisc player, it plays picture, as well as sound. The Magnavision videodisc playing system was unveiled yesterday and went on sale today in three area stores. Magnavox calls it a “new wonder of consumer electronics.” Under development the past 8 years, the Magnavision system attaches to the antenna terminals of a television set. It scans the videodisc with a tiny beam of light, recapturing the movies and other filmed features stored on bits inside the silvery platter. There is no needle or stylus, thus Magnavox declares there is almost no wear on the disc no matter how many times it is played. Recent movie “Animal House” sells for $15.95. There are 200 movies in the Maganavox catalog. The player also allows the viewer to speed up, slow down, freeze and even reverse action.

FCC approves two new stations

Stredicke-of-Seattle-Times1December 22, 1963 – The Federal Communications Commission has approved licenses for two new area radio stations. KAGT, an Anacortes outlet which began broadcasting last week, features popular and semi-classical music from 6 a.m. until midnight on 1340 kilocycles. It will also air Anacortes High School basketball games.
KBRO, when it goes on the air, will be a full-time FM stereo station, programming dinner music and show tunes 18 hours a day. The outlet, owned by the Bremerton Broadcast Co., will have an effective radiated power of 30 kilowatts and will broadcast on 106.9 megacycles.

Jack Morton

Veteran KVI air personality, Jack Morton died June 1st. Morton started his career at KMO Tacoma, then owned by his father Archie. Jack Morton was hired by KVI in 1963 and remained there well into the 1970s. Morton switched over to KOL for a period when KVI shuffled the deck chairs, and after returning to KVI and finally leaving AM 570, Morton did a stint at KRPM. Later, Jack Morton worked at KIXI. The format was more akin to the MOR style of the early KVI/Golden West Broadcasters years.

Executive changes in Seattle radio

stredicke-headerNovember 1979 – Michael O’Shea, former program director at KVI, has been named national program director of Golden West Broadcasters. The program director doesn’t direct any programs, anymore. He directs the talent, inspires them to do their best.
O’Shea’s challenge is to get the best performance out of such diverse personalities, for example, as Gary Owens and Don Drysdale, at KMPC Los Angeles and Bob Hardwick and Bob Robertson at KVI.
O’Shea came to KVI two and a half years ago from Fort Lauderdale Florida. He left KVI four months ago, lured away by the Los Angeles station, KPOL.

Steve West and KTAC rocked KJR’s Pierce County ratings

Steve West started in radio in Hoquiam. In 1967, West joined the KJR, becoming the all night disc-jockey and newsman. West was then hired by KTAC as Program Director. KTAC climbed to the top rated position in Pierce county, replacing nine year leader, KJR. West hired some great talent for KTAC, including Gary Crow. Pat O’Day countered West’s success [or rather “recognized” West’s talent] by offering Steve West the position of Program Director at KJRB Spokane. West returned to KJR in 1974 as PD there.

August 26, 1979 / Steve West has traded AM for FM and moved from KJR to sister-station KISW as its new general manager. He was assistant manager of KJR for three months. At the FM station, he replaces Harry Caraco who is moving to other areas of business. West has been with KJR for five years as program director. Before that he was program director at another Kaye-Smith station, KJRB in Spokane.
Edie Hilliard, general sales manager at KJR, will take over the additional duties of assistant manager there. She joined the station in 1975 as an account executive and in 1977 was named sales manager. Ms. Hilliard began with Kaye-Smith Radio in 1972 as the corporate promotions manager.

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